Mentoring Works!

Littles who are matched with Bigs show improvements in education, self-confidence, and juvenile justice leading them on the path to success.

Boosting Self-Confidence

 Think back to when you were young. Who helped you to believe in yourself and what you could accomplish? Big Brothers Big Sisters mentors, donors, families, advocates, and supporters work hard to encourage and support today's children. When those children believe in themselves and what they can accomplish, they'll enjoy better relationships with their friends, families, and peers, and they'll help create safer, stronger communities.

What our Littles say:

Our impact on our Little's self-confidence is confirmed by those closest to it: our Littles. In a 2009, we commissioned industry leader Civic Enterprises to conduct a nationwide survey of our Bigs and Littles. The results speak volumes about the ways in which Big Brothers Big Sisters helps to change a child's life for the better, forever:



Despite the barriers they face, 94% of Littles said they have a lot or some confidence they will achieve their goals.

 

 

93% of Littles said to have adults who care and look out for them is very important to helping them achieve their goals.



80% of Littles said they feel their Bigs help them a lot.

What our Alumni say:

Our impact on a child's self-confidence and emotional well-being is felt long after Littles graduate from high school. In 2009, Harris Interactive conducted an online survey of alumni Littles from across the nation. Among those former Littles:

• 90% agreed their Big made them feel better about themselves.

• 86% agreed they lead a fulfilling life.

• 72% said they are satisfied or extremely satisfied with their relationships with friends.

Impacting Education

Our impact on education is evident in research conducted by Public/Private Ventures and published in 1995. When comparing children matched with a Big Brother or Big Sister to those waiting to be served by Big Brothers Big Sisters, these researchers found that:

• Littles skipped half as many days of school as did their peers.
• Littles felt more competent about doing schoolwork.
• Littles skipped fewer classes than did their peers.
• Children who are in school, in class, and engaged in their work are more likely to succeed.

What our current Littles say:
Our impact on education is confirmed by those closest to it: our Littles. In a 2009, we commissioned industry leader Civic Enterprises to conduct a nationwide survey of our Bigs and Littles. Of those children surveyed:

• 97% of Littles said working hard in school is very important.
• 95% of Littles said going to school and getting a good education is very important.
• 94% of Littles said graduating from college is very important.

Children who work hard, recognize the value of education, and set a goal of going to college are more likely to succeed.

What our alumni say:

Our impact on education is felt long after Littles graduate from high school. In 2009, Harris Interactive conducted an online survey of alumni Littles from across the nation. Among those former Littles:

• 77% said they are doing better in school because of their Big.
• 65% agreed their Big helped them reach a higher level of education that they thought possible.
• 52% agreed their Big kept them from dropping out of high school.

Children who graduate from high school, perform well in school, and achieve beyond their expectations are successful in school and in life.

Impacting Juvenile Justice:

Big Brothers Big Sisters knows that children who avoid interactions with the juvenile justice system – and violence, drugs, and alcohol - are more likely to succeed. That's why our professional staff members, supporters, families, and advocates support, encourage and champion the relationships between Bigs and Littles. Bigs help teach their Littles right from wrong and help them make good decisions.

The landmark study:


Our impact on juvenile justice is evident in research conducted by Public/Private Ventures and published in 1995. When comparing Littles matched with a Big to children waiting to be served by Big Brothers Big Sisters, these researchers found that:



Littles were 46 percent less likely to start using drugs.



Littles were 27 percent less likely to start using alcohol.



Littles were almost one-third less likely to hit someone.

What our alumni say:

 

Our impact on decision-making is felt long after Littles graduate from high school and from our program. In 2009, Harris Interactive conducted an online survey of alumni Littles from across the nation. Among those former Littles:



90% said their relationship with their Big helped them make better choices throughout their childhood.



86% said their relationship with their Big has helped them make better choices throughout their adult life.

 

 

76% said they learned right from wrong from their Big.